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Adonit announces Neo Pro wireless chargeable charger for iPads

Adonit Neo Pro

Adonit has expanded its NEO magnetically attachable stylus lineup with the launch of Adonit Neo Pro, the first of the series to include wireless charging when attached to the side of compatible iPad Pro, iPad Air, and iPad mini models. 

Users can simply snap and go as the Neo Pro magnetically attaches to their compatible device, and wirelessly charges in the process. Native palm rejection allows writers, drawers, or app navigators to rest their hand on the screen without leaving stray lines on the page, according to asper Li, chief technical officer and co-founder of Adonit. The stylus also provides tilt sensitivity, allowing for more precise lines and shades. In addition, the Neo Pro has an easy-to-read battery, showing the status from the widget when it connects to Bluetooth, Li says. He adds that additional features include: 

  • Magnetically Attach & Wirelessly Charge: Adonit Neo Pro magnetically attaches to compatible devices and automatically charges on the go. No more rolling and lost stylus in the middle of a project; simply snap it on and go. 
  • Native Palm Rejection: Users can rest their palm comfortably on the screen without leaving stray lines on the page.
  • Tilt Sensitivity: Creates a smoother and more natural pen-like experience with numerous varieties of lines and shades at any angle. 
  • Easy-To-Read Battery Status: Neo Pro shows its battery status from the widget when it connects to Bluetooth.
  • Replaceable Tip: The Adonit Neo Pro features a spiral tip that can be replaced easily when it’s worn down (includes 2 replacement nibs).

TheNeo Pro is compatible with iPad Air (4th/5th Gen), iPad mini 6th Gen, iPad Pro 11″ (1st/2nd/3rd Gen) iPad Pro 12.9″ (3rd/4th/5th Gen) and newer. It has a manufacturer’s suggested retail price of US$44.99 and is available for purchase at Adonit.net in gray and silver version.

Dennis Sellers
the authorDennis Sellers
Dennis Sellers is the editor/publisher of Apple World Today. He’s been an “Apple journalist” since 1995 (starting with the first big Apple news site, MacCentral). He loves to read, run, play sports, and watch movies.