Thursday, September 23, 2021
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Apple granted patent for a ‘finger-mounted device with fabric’

It’s kinda of an ‘Apple Glove,’ only not

Apple has been granted a patent (number 11,042,233) for a “finger-mounted device with fabric.” It’s one of several such patents that involve controlling the rumored “Apple Glasses,” Macs, and other devices.

Electronic equipment such as computers and head-mounted display systems are sometimes controlled using input-output devices such as gloves. A glove may have sensors that detect user hand motions. The user hand motions can be used in controlling electronic equipment. 

In the patent data, Apple says that the use of wearable devices to gather input for controlling electronic equipment can pose challenges. If care isn’t taken, a device such as a glove may affect the ability of a user to feel objects in the user’s surroundings. It may be uncomfortable to use, or may not gather suitable input from the user. 

Apple’s idea is a finger-mounted device (or devices) made of fabric. The fabric may be attached to the body using wrapping techniques, intertwining techniques, adhesive attachment methods, molding attachment methods, or other suitable techniques. 

Here’s the summary of the patent: “A finger-mounted electronic device may include a body that serves as a support structure for components such as force sensors, accelerometers, and other sensors and for haptic output devices. The body may have first and second side body members that leave the finger pad exposed and an upper body member extending between the first and second side body members. Some or all of the body may be covered in fabric or leather. 

“Fabric may wrap around the first and second side body members and may extend across the upper body member. The fabric may cover electronic components. A touch sensor may have electrodes that are formed from conductive material on the fabric or conductive strands in the fabric. Infrared-reflective ink may form visual markers on the fabric for an infrared tracking system. The fabric may have light-transmissive portions that overlap optical components.”

Dennis Sellers
the authorDennis Sellers
Dennis Sellers is the editor/publisher of Apple World Today. He’s been an “Apple journalist” since 1995 (starting with the first big Apple news site, MacCentral). He loves to read, run, play sports, and watch movies.