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Study Shows Human Hours Taken For Apple To Reach $1 Billion Milestone

EmailToolTester has released a new study that examines how many hours of work it took to build big tech and help them achieve all-important financial milestones.

It reviews salaries, revenue, and employee information across some of the largest Big Tech companies in the world to calculate the human power required to succeed. Here are som key findings from the report:

  • Apple has the second highest revenue per hour of employee’s time at US$1,284, only marginally beaten by Netflix ($1,319).
  • Samsung and Alphabet (Google) added the most employees in their first 10 years (21,896 and 16,802 respectively), compared to just 4,544 for Apple.
  • Apple took the highest amount of employee hours to get to $100 million in total revenue (2,738,749 hours) compared to its Big Tech Competitors. 
  • Netflix hit $100 billion in total revenue in the fewest amount of employee hours, at over 107 million hours, followed by Meta with over 148 million hours.
  • Netflix has the highest revenue per hour of employee’s time at $1,319, closely followed by Apple ($1,284).
  • Alphabet (formerly Google) took the fewest amount of employee hours to get to $1 million in total revenue at 5,961 hours. 
  • Samsung and Alphabet (Google) added the most employees in their first 10 years (21,896 and 16,802 respectively). 
  • OpenAI had more employees in its 8th year (2022) than Microsoft did in 8 years of business (335 vs 220).
  • OpenAI’s first 10-year employee growth (17,500%) is estimated to be a higher percentage increase than Netflix (4,233%) and Samsung (15,982%) in their first 10 years.
  • Amazon has the most employees out of all Big Tech organizations and had exponential growth during the pandemic, doubling its workforce from its 26th to 28th year (2019-2021) of business. 

EmailToolTester is a website designed to “help you find the right email marketing service.”

Dennis Sellers
the authorDennis Sellers
Dennis Sellers is the editor/publisher of Apple World Today. He’s been an “Apple journalist” since 1995 (starting with the first big Apple news site, MacCentral). He loves to read, run, play sports, and watch movies.