iPadiPhonePatents

Apple granted patent for ‘Multi-User Configuration’ on an iPhone (and perhaps the iPad)

Apple has been granted a patent for a “Multi-User Configuration” on an iPhone — and, perhaps, on the iPad.

Apple has been granted a patent (number US 11983551 B2) for a “Multi-User Configuration” on an iPhone — and, perhaps, on the iPad. The ability for the tablet to be able to support multiple user profiles has long been wished for.

About the patent

The patent relates generally to computer user interfaces, and more specifically to techniques for multi-user configuration of electronic devices. Apple says the number of electronic devices, and particularly smart devices, in users’ homes continues to increase. These devices are required to perform increasingly complex tasks, including user-specific tasks in multi-user environments.

However, Apple says that some techniques for multi-user configuration using electronic devices, however, are “generally cumbersome and inefficient.” The company’s patent involves techniques to provide electronic devices such as the iPhone and iPad with faster, more efficient methods and interfaces for multi-user configurations. The patent also involves HomePods and HomePod minis that can respond to different voices.

Summary of the patent

Here’s Apple’s abstract of the patent: “Examples of multi-user configuration are disclosed. An example method includes, at an electronic device: receiving a request; and in response to the request: if the voice input does not match a voice profile associated with an account associated with the electronic device: causing output of first information based on the request using a first account associated with the electronic device; if a setting of the electronic device has a first state, causing update of account data of the first account based on the request; and if the setting has a second state, forgoing causing update of the account data; and if the voice input matches a voice profile associated with an account associated with the electronic device: causing output of the first information using the account associated with the matching voice profile; and causing update of account data of the account based on the request.”

Dennis Sellers
the authorDennis Sellers
Dennis Sellers is the editor/publisher of Apple World Today. He’s been an “Apple journalist” since 1995 (starting with the first big Apple news site, MacCentral). He loves to read, run, play sports, and watch movies.